Blog - AntiVestor.com

How to find the best stocks to trade today, every day on demand

Why read this?

…Why not.

Back when I had a real job (a little more than 20+ years ago as I type this) I remember having one of those epiphany moments whilst taking some time to read something trading related and I remember thinking;

This is nothing new

The truth is that there is not a lot that is new in trading/investing as well as most areas in life. Trading books mostly talk about what setup is the current flavour of the day and like most people I’ve traded a lot of those different ways over the years.

The single thing I learned was;

Everything works some of the time and nothing works all of the time

As soon as you realise that you will start to do better in your trading as there is no such thing as the holy grail in this or any other business. Continue reading . . .

The Consumers Guide To Choosing A Stock & Options Broker

Have you ever been confused about which is the best stock or stock options broker to use? How can you tell?

This guide is aimed to help you make a more informed decision as to which stock broker may be the best stock broker for your very specific needs.

In this guide you will discover;

  • How to spot 4 unnecessary stock broker fees
  • 3 costly misconceptions about your stock broker
  • 7 deadly dangers of making the wrong choice of stock broker
  • The #1 fee’s hack that will save you “literally” thousands in fees every year.

Continue reading . . .

How You Can Trade Earnings News (the easy way)

Have you ever wondered about the best way to trade the news (trading earnings)?

Most traders who attempt to trade stocks based on earnings or news have certainly been on the wrong side of a stocks movement due to the news, but what if you could be intentional about trading the news and get positioned ahead of a known news item.

One of the ways Ive been finding great looking stocks for event based trading, as we move into another stock earnings cycle, is to look at Implied Volatility Rank. (IVR)

This is a measure of implied volatility (IV) compared to itself in the last 12 months.

So, if the IV is is near the lowest it has been in the last 12 months then the stock options could be considered inexpensive compared to how they have been priced in the last 12 months.

As such it would be said to have a low IRV. Continue reading . . .

Finding the best stocks for options trading in 2018

I am regularly asked about how to find the best stocks for options trading and in 2018. The process below is for finding a suitable list of stock to have on my core list which Ive been using for many years.

You need your own core list or universe of stocks because looking at every stock in the known universe is stoopid and I certainly have got time to scan 12,000+ stocks without having some really critical filtering

Lets also agree that you do not need to look at every stock as some just are not worth the time or effort.

Thankfully there are many software tools and online tools both free and paid that will help you create a suitable universe of stocks for you to draw from in your day to day trading.

How to find the best stocks for options trading in 2018

This short check list is something that I run through once or twice per year to ensure I have a liquid pool of stocks that have potential to move and do interesting things with which to draw my daily stock selections from. Continue reading . . .

Avoid High Risk Investments… Duh!

[Tip] – Avoid High Risk Investments…

I saw this piece of advice earlier on the interweb as being a “good piece of advice” for investing

I couldn’t help but think what I redundant piece of bullshit advice

Without any qualifier whatsoever, you might as well say “avoid juggling with kitchen knives”

Well, duh!

High Risk in most contexts is what the dumb folk call;

“A good opportunity, but I don’t have a fecking clue what do with it!”

What exactly is a high risk, let alone a high risk investment?

Continue reading . . .

Tesla Is Tumbling, But Not All Is Lost (Yet)

Ahoy there, It’s Phil

While the world is going mad over Tesla dropping a few percentage points (and of course the media is lapping it up). There is still nothing to panic over, at least for the moment.

There is also an army of  people who can talk about the company profile and order book profiles and projections and other such fundamental view points, I just never got around to figuring that stuff out beyond a few helpful ratios.

Tesla stock predictions

From a technical charting perspective on the weekly charts, this is still a break out candidate and this sell off which was news related is simply the pullback portion of this set up. Continue reading . . .

Why trade options instead of stocks?

Why trade options instead of stocks? I love this question because I’ve done both and a whole range of other markets and instruments over the years and right now I absolutely know stock options are the best vehicle to use to trade stocks.

The why is simple.

Stock options are the greatest use of my resources.

Stock options are cost effective because I can control the same 100 shares for a fraction of the cost.

Margin requirements only require the purchase price to be paid and no longer do you need the margin for the stock you control (they assumed you would take delivery) Continue reading . . .

The #1 guide to trading with support and resistance (with examples)

Before we get into to the meat and potatoes of support and resistance, I will be focusing my examples on stocks support and resistance but these methods can equally be applied on forex (which I spent 12-yrs day trading and swing trading) or index futures (which Ive been trading since 2001) or any market you care to trade with a chart based trading system.

With that said, lets get started.

What is support and resistance in trading?

In stock market technical analysis the terms support and resistance are used when a stocks price moves down to a lower level and then goes no further (at least temporarily) in this example it is often called support.

The opposite is also true in that when a stock price moves to a higher level and then goes no further (at least temporarily). This is often called resistance.

These support and resistance levels are often interchangeable with other terms such as supply and demand levels, levels of interest.

Most commonly, I refer to these points on the charts as logical stopping points. Continue reading . . .

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